Japanese

Miso Noodle Soup

This miso noodle soup is just what you need to cure whatever ails you! Thick, chewy homemade noodles and a variety of colourful seasonal veggies in a delicious broth of vegetarian dashi and miso paste. It’s like the Japanese version of vegetarian chicken soup!

This miso noodle soup is just what you need to cure whatever ails you! Thick, chewy homemade noodles and a variety of colourful seasonal veggies in a delicious broth of vegetarian dashi and miso paste. It’s like the Japanese version of vegetarian chicken soup!

If you’ve been following along you’ll know that I’ve been all about the vegan noodle soup recipes lately. This creamy sesame vegan ramen is my new favourite way to make ramen (dare I say I’ll never make it any other way!) and this vegan pho with crispy seasoned tofu, bok choy and frizzled green onions is to die for!

So when I saw a video for this miso noodle soup, it immediately went on the list of recipes to try. This is a veganized version of a Japanese soup called houtou (sometimes also written hōtō) – a soup that’s no so well known outside of Japan (till now, lol!).

This soup features thickly cut homemade wheat noodles (they’re easy to make, don’t worry) and loads of vegetables in a miso broth. The great thing about this soup is that the vegetables change according to the season so you can feel free to change up the veggies depending on what you have.

Almost every recipe I saw for houtou had squash or pumpkin, usually a kabocha  squash. Kabocha squash are deliciously sweet but not so easy to find unless you have an Asian supermarket nearby. So this time I substituted a generically labeled “pumpkin” from my local supermarket.

Houtou noodles freshly made for miso noodle soup.

This post contains affiliate links which help offset the cost of running this blog with no additional cost to you.

To make this vegan miso noodle soup you can start with a vegetarian dashi stock. For that you’ll need a piece of kombu seaweed and a few dried shiitake mushrooms (again, a trip to the Asian supermarket). However, I did see a recipe or two that made houtou noodle soup with just plain water (and miso, of course) so if you don’t have kombu you can still go ahead with this miso noodle soup recipe.

While you prepare the dashi and simmer the vegetables you can make the noodles. It’s a simple dough of two parts flour to one part water. Once you’ve kneaded it into a soft ball you can get to work rolling it out; this dough does not need to be rested.

I used my pasta maker, which gets a lot of use in my house as I also use it to make homemade ramen noodles from scratch, and it make the job quick and easy. You can also use a rolling pin, no problem. Roll it out to a thickness of 2 – 3 mm and cut it into noodles of 1 cm. Toss them in a bit of flour to prevent sticking.

This miso noodle soup is just what you need to cure whatever ails you! Thick, chewy homemade noodles and a variety of colourful seasonal veggies in a delicious broth of vegetarian dashi and miso paste. It’s like the Japanese version of vegetarian chicken soup!

You might be asking if you can make it easier on yourself and substitute any kind of store-bought noodle for this recipe. The thing with the homemade noodles is that the flour you’ve tossed them in also thickens the broth and creates a deliciously thick and creamy miso noodle soup.

You’d need to add in some flour at some point if you used store-bought noodles and the noodles surely wouldn’t have the same thick, chewy texture. But you can go ahead and try it!

Serves 2 bowls

Miso Noodle Soup

This miso noodle soup features thick, chewy homemade noodles and a variety of colourful seasonal veggies in a delicious broth of vegetarian dashi and miso.

20 minPrep Time

25 minCook Time

45 minTotal Time

Save RecipeSave Recipe
    Ingredients
  • A piece of kombu about 30 grams / 1 oz * (see note)
  • 1 litre (4 cups) cold water
  • 150 grams (5.29 oz, a little more than a cup) flour, plus more for flouring the dough
  • 75 ml (1/3 cup) warm water
  • 4 dried shiitake mushrooms (about 10 grams / 0.35 oz)
  • 150 grams (5 oz) diced pumpkin or squash
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • A quarter of a turnip**, sliced or diced
  • 1 parsnip, sliced
  • 3 – 4 leaves of bok choy (or another leafy green), cut into bite-sized pieces and stems separated from leaves
  • 5 button mushrooms, quartered
  • 1 green onion, cut into 3 cm sticks and a few slices of the green tops and reserved for garnish
  • 100 grams (3.5 oz) cabbage, sliced
  • 2 ½ tablespoons miso paste (adjust depending on the saltiness of your paste)
    Instructions
  1. Put the kombu and water in a pot and gently heat over medium heat. It should take about 20 minutes before it breaks to a boil. If you see any foam on the water, carefully skim it out. In the meantime make the noodles.
  2. To make the noodles combine the flour and the water and knead until you get a soft dough. Use a pasta maker or a rolling pin (on a floured counter) to roll the dough out to a thickness of about 3 mm. Lightly flour the dough and fold it over itself into thirds. Use a knife to cut 1 cm noodles, unfold them and put them on a plate. Sprinkle over some flour and toss to coat so that they don’t stick together.
  3. Back to the stock. Just before the water breaks to a boil, remove the kombu and add the shiitake mushrooms. Boil for 1 minute then remove from the heat and steep for 5 minutes. Finally, strain the stock through a fine mesh strainer lined with paper towels. This is your dashi.
  4. Put the dashi in a medium pot and bring to a simmer. Add the pumpkin or squash, reduce the heat to low, cover the pot and simmer till almost tender. Then add the tougher vegetables: carrot, turnip, parsnip, white and light green parts of the green onion, bok choy stems and mushrooms, cover the pot and continue to simmer.
  5. Once the tougher veggies are almost tender, add your noodles. Simmer, covered, for 8 minutes, stirring occasionally to separate the noodles. Then add the leafy green parts of the bok choy, cabbage and green parts of the green onion. Simmer for 2 more minutes or until all the vegetables are tender.
  6. Remove a ladleful of the stock into a small bowl and add the miso paste. Stir to dissolve then add it into the soup and stir well to combine. Divide the soup into 2 bowls and garnish with the reserved green onion tops.
7.6.6
361
http://www.cilantroandcitronella.com/miso-noodle-soup/

Note: *If you don’t have kombu or dried shiitake mushrooms, I have also seen versions of this recipe made with plain water. **Use a variety of seasonal vegetables, feel free to change up the ingredients I’ve listed here depending on what you have. You want a small amount each of a variety of vegetables.


Join our newsletter to get your free copy of our new ebook A Colourful Kitchen

SUBMIT

No Comments

Leave a Reply

Join our newsletter to get your free copy of our new ebook A Colourful Kitchen
SUBSCRIBE
close-link

Join our newsletter to get your free copy of our new ebook A Colourful Kitchen

SUBMIT
close-link
Need more vegan recipe inspiration?

Join our newsletter and get a free copy of our new ebook A Colourful Kitchen

10 easy and delicious vegan recipes from around the world!.
SUBMIT
close-link
Suscríbete al blog y recibirás una copia gratis de nuestro eBook Una Cocina Multicolor
ENVIAR
close-link
No te lo pierdas
Suscríbete al blog y recibirás una copia gratis de nuestro eBook
Enviar
105 Shares
Pin104
Share1
Flip
+1
Stumble